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1968 Plymouth GTX

#41
About 2 decades ago I used some urethane sealer (for windshields) between a new door skin and the inner crash bar. The sealer shrunk and pulled
little divots all across the new door skin. I think 3M and Lord Fusor have flexible foam products just for this application.
I use the Lord Fusor seam sealer and panel adhesive when needed. I will check into this. Thank you.
 
#42
Lord Fusor Flexible Foam:
FUS-121 (300 ml cartridge)
FUS-124 (50 ml cartridge)

"Sound deadening, sealing and filling of door skins to crash bar, hood panel to supports, trunk panel to supports....."
 
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#43
Already have it in the cart. Best price with shipping I could find was on Amazon.
Figured I better get the 300 cartridge since I will most likely end up removing the roof skin as well.
 
#44
Never had trouble with it. But you are 100% correct. There is products made for this. I will have to not use this windshield adhesive trick anymore. I don't want to take the chance of shrinkage. Thanks.
 
#45
The inner and center supports after a trip to the blast cabinet. The holes I drilled through when removing the spot welds will get welded up prior to epoxy primer going on.
Inner Supports Media Blasted.JPG

Removed the hood hinge nut assemblies:
Hood Hinge Nut Assemblies removed.JPG

Look much nicer blasted:
Hood Hinge Nut Assemblies blasted.JPG

While washing the support structure and hood skin I use a hammer and dolly to straighten any problem areas. Much easier to do at this stage then after assembly.
Washing Inner Structure.JPG

As can be seen in the first two pictures I started working on the underside of the hood skin. It is very slow going at low pressure and I ran out of time to finish it. Temps drop quickly when the sun is going down.
I plan to DA the top of the hood to remove the paint and primer once reassembled.
 
#46
Working on the upper control arms:
Upper Control Arm.JPG

After a trip through the cleaning process:
Upper Control Arm Blasted.JPG

Made a discovery while cleaning up the lower control arms. It appears these are the original LCAs but that some hack cut off the sway bar brackets. My guess is they installed the discs brakes incorrectly (calipers toward the front) and it wouldn't clear the sway bar so they cut them off.
Lower Control Arm welds.JPG

Top portion of the bracket is still there surrounding the upper bolt hole.
Lower Control Arms Blasted.JPG

I ordered a set of weld on brackets to replace theses.
Next I was looking at the steering knuckles. I couldn't find any numbers on them and the only markings are these raised triangles.
So I am wondering if these are reversible? Could relocating the calipers to the backside be as simple as swapping these steering knuckles?
IMGP0032.JPG
 
#47
Fabricated some patches for the doors where someone hacked them up for speakers.
It has been quite a while since I needed to do this type of works so to say I am a bit rusty would be an understatement.
Picked the easier one (LOL) to start with.
Door Driver damage.JPG

Door Driver's Patch.JPG

The other door was a bit more challenging Door Passenger Damage.JPG

First patch:
Door Passenger's Patch.JPG

Door Passenger's Patch 1.JPG

Still need to drill a hole in this one.
I know they are not perfect but I hope to improve as the project progresses.
 
#50
Lord Fusor Flexible Foam:
FUS-121 (300 ml cartridge)
FUS-124 (50 ml cartridge)

"Sound deadening, sealing and filling of door skins to crash bar, hood panel to supports, trunk panel to supports....."
Reading the instructions on this expandable foam and it says it grows 10 times the size of what you put on. Apparently it expands in 5-10 seconds, ready to handle in 2-3 minutes and ready to paint in 10 minutes with full cure in 1 hour.

Anybody have experience with this product that can offer any tips?

Right now I am thinking I will need a helper in order to get the foam down and roof skin installed and clamped in place inside of 3 minutes. :eek:
 
#51
put the skin on first then go back and add the foam. just squirt a little dab between the roof and bracing were you need it. if you have several spots to do have some extra mixing tips handy, I have had it setup in the tip while I was repositioning before. I have only used the 3m and IES brands but can't see the fusor being much different.
 
#52
I was hoping to mimic the OEM application as seen here:
Scraping prior to Washing.JPG

I have test fitted the skin over the epoxied structure and thought maybe setting it up like this except with the structure on the bottom might be the way to get it done:
Hood Separated 2.JPG

As you can see there are a lot of spots so I would have to move quickly.
 
#53
Spoke with Lord Fusor tech support this morning and they didn't think this product was right for what I was trying to do. The work time is only 5-10 seconds as the product begins expanding as soon as it hits the air. They also said it would resemble a soft foam like that in a pillow.

They recommended a black urethane product FUS-231 but when reading the information it doesn't say it's paintable.

Would like to know what others have used for this application.
 
#54
'68, I am sorry for the trouble and expense my recommendation has caused you. Even though I have never used that product I assumed it was the proper product based on how it was advertised by Lord Fusor. I was unaware of FUS-231. For sure, from now on, I will not suggest a product I have no experience with.
I truly hope you can find something that will work great very soon and please keep us up-to-date on your progress.
 
#55
'68, I am sorry for the trouble and expense my recommendation has caused you. Even though I have never used that product I assumed it was the proper product based on how it was advertised by Lord Fusor. I was unaware of FUS-231. For sure, from now on, I will not suggest a product I have no experience with.
I truly hope you can find something that will work great very soon and please keep us up-to-date on your progress.
No problem. I had read the description and it definitely said it was for this type of application. My concern was the work time being only 10 seconds long and that prompted my call to their tech line.

They said the FUS-121 expandable foam is normally applied after assembly by squeezing a small bead into the gaps. This would not give me the OEM look that I was hoping to achieve.

The Lord Fusor FUS-231 is twice the price (of course) and appears to be more of a black urethane adhesive. They said it would cure to a rubber like substance a little firmer than say a bicycle tire.
 
#57
Don't you want something with a long working time, even after setting the two pieces together? You still have to make sure it isn't pushing the hood skin up too far, or not giving enough support. I doubt that anything that expands is going to give the proper shape to the hood.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#58
68 the 8367 will work for what you want. I've always used it (or something comparable) in situations like that. Is it concours correct? I don't know. But it does do what you want it to. Would be more effective if you epoxy everything before you apply it. If you want something concours correct I would get in touch with one of the high end Mopar restorers and see what they use.

Looking a little closer at the pic, what else holds the understructure to the skin? If it's just the adhesive I would use panel bond in some places to ensure it stays in place. Seam sealer will not really provide a bond, more of a cushion between the two. If those holes on the sides of the skin are spot welds then no need for the panel bond.

The anti-flutter products out now are really designed to duplicate what OEM's are doing on current stuff. If in doubt get in touch with someone like Roger Gibson at Roger Gibson Restorations. Find out what he uses.
 
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#60
68 the 8367 will work for what you want. I've always used it (or something comparable) in situations like that. Is it concours correct? I don't know. But it does do what you want it to. Would be more effective if you epoxy everything before you apply it. If you want something concours correct I would get in touch with one of the high end Mopar restorers and see what they use.

Looking a little closer at the pic, what else holds the understructure to the skin? If it's just the adhesive I would use panel bond in some places to ensure it stays in place. Seam sealer will not really provide a bond, more of a cushion between the two. If those holes on the sides of the skin are spot welds then no need for the panel bond.

The anti-flutter products out now are really designed to duplicate what OEM's are doing on current stuff. If in doubt get in touch with someone like Roger Gibson at Roger Gibson Restorations. Find out what he uses.
The skin is spot welded to the support structure all around the perimeter. The sealer/adhesive fills the void between the skin and structure to keep it from flexing/vibrating.
 
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