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What every new painter must read!

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#21
packin31;2940 said:
Hum I wonder if my Packard would be worth that much since I used all SPI from the epoxy to the SS Black well expect for the Mahogany Red. :)

Sounds like a money maker to me, maybe they won't deduct to much because the red was PPG. LOL
 
#22
Barryk;2945 said:
Sounds like a money maker to me, maybe they won't deduct to much because the red was PPG. LOL
No PPG here. It was Pro Spray so nothing should be deducted :)

For my cleaning it was pretty much just vacuum up as much dust and debris as possible and hung new plastic seething over the old seething.
 
#23
after reading a tread on another site i thought i'd bring this up. for me the last step in prep for paint is to clean all edges and peaks or crevices . i cut them to metal before sealer. i do not want a ton of materials cantilevered off the edge to snap off or have a deep valley that does not gas out well and ends up in a bubble. that is a chip waiting to happen. i believe the #1 thing new painters do is leave too much primer on the car. especially on edges and in body lines.
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
#24
Yes, I average two calls a month where say two coats of epoxy is applied to the car, so the seams end up with four and then "air dried seam sealer" is applied the next day and it bubbles.

Seams get sprayed wetter by default and they need longer to dry or problems will occur.

great point Shine!
 
#25
I've been doing the same thing to the edges, Shine. I think it was Crashtech that gave me this advice.

I used to leave too much primer on too. Now I just keep blocking my primer with 100 grit until I can see even scratches in everything, or hit bare metal. Once I get even 100 scratches without rubbing through, then I move up to 180 and 320. Is this inline with what you do Shine?
 
#26
i use epoxy only . i apply a coat and block repeat until i'm ready then move up to 180 next coat then 320 for the last coat . i wet sand everything .
 
#29
Thats what I've been doing, so the epoxy doesn't bridge. I just wanted your opinion, becasue I know the consensus is to sand to 180 to avoid primer shrinkage.
 
#33
[QUOTE='68 Coronet R/T;7965]Shine,
I forgot to mention that you have your own section on the consolidation cheat sheet under the heading: "Some tips, pointers and words of wisdom from Shine."[/QUOTE]

Make sure you have Shine's tip on how to properly care for a HF Purple gun!
 
#35
Just to clarify for this newb -

The knock about lacquer thinner ... I assume you mean don't use lacquer thinner as a grease and wax remover. I also presume this is because it leaves an oily residue?
 
#36
don't put anything on it you wouldn't mix with the paint. the exception being water base w&g remover. lacquer thinner is for rinsing guns or spreaders .
 
#37
timgr;13101 said:
Just to clarify for this newb -

The knock about lacquer thinner ... I assume you mean don't use lacquer thinner as a grease and wax remover. I also presume this is because it leaves an oily residue?
No, it's because the evaporation rate is too quick to remove all the substances that it dissolves, resulting in contaminants being smeared around instead of being removed by the second wipe.
 
#38
the problem with lacquer thinner is not how fast it dries . the problem is you never know what it is. if your buying 5 gal cans at 30+ your buying recycled solvents. it' sold to clean up guns and such so don't even mix it in good lacquer paint unless your wanting to know how to make jelly. this is one of the very first mistakes that is made by novice painters because they read all the bs post by experts who use it to clean with. same guys swear by etch primer and k36 too .
 
#40
Lacquer thinner will absorb water if it contains wood alcohol or acetone, and cheap thinner usually has both.

There is a third problem with using thinner as a cleaner. If the thinner is able to soften or partially dissolve the surface being cleaned, it is very likely that contamination will end up embedded in the surface.

@shine: Nearly all wax and grease removers have a pretty slow evaporation rate because they are meant to stay wet on the panel until a second wipe picks it up. Do you disagree?
 
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