Wagon Progress

MJM

Promoted Users
The metal fabrication that has been done, and the metal fabrication that is being done now, just amazes me.

I don't know who the young man is that's assisting you but, I hope he's paying attention. He's getting hands on experience that could last him a life time.

Seriously, thanks for sharing. I know it takes time to make these threads and posts. Many here greatly enjoy them, including myself.
 

MP&C

Member
Thanks guys!

I don't know who the young man is that's assisting you but, I hope he's paying attention. He's getting hands on experience that could last him a life time.

I have two guys helping out, one is a Jet mechanic and the other just graduated high school with plans on a Mechanical Engineering degree.



More progress on the fan shroud... Wire edging!! In order to stave off any rust issue as long as we can, I normally treat the wire channel to epoxy primer from the inside-out. So we used a scotchbrite pad and some Ivory liquid in warm water to remove any last remnants of the WD40 used for the last shaping effort on the Lennox.


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Our wire had been test fitted, sized, and tig welded together to form a continuous ring. This adds tremendous strength to the edge and helps to maintain a concentric circle. The wire was then cleaned as well. SPI epoxy was hand applied (acid brush) to the channel, the wire ring pressed in place (it was that tight) and then any bare spots on the ring epoxied as well..


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The vise grips hold the wire snug to the bottom of the channel until the edge of the flange can be staked in place. Wire edging process, done using our cone anvil, various hammers, and a 90 durometer polyurethane pad for the final closure of the wrap..




At the point we were hammering, the epoxy had set up approx 10-15 minutes, so it was not dry yet, but not running either. We'll let the epoxy set a couple days and get additional coats in the slight gap at the edge of the wrap in order to seal things well for rust prevention.


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And our inside dimension worked out to what we were looking for, 18-1/8 diameter for our 17-1/4 fan blade.


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We also got another delivery, some 4" louver dies from Mittler Bros Machine and Tool for another job coming up. Will have to sneak it in here on some wagon parts as well.


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MP&C

Member
Looking at the fan shroud, the top and bottom will be stepped where it bolts behind the rear edge of the core support.


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The sides will get a radius bend to bolt to the inside vertical of the core support. This still leave quite a bit of flat metal that just doesn't have much style to it. So let's try some embossing on the side panels.. To better keep things a consistent pattern from left to right, we made a pattern using MDF board..


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An offset die set is made in the Southbend lathe, the rounded sides will allow it to better travel along the pattern cutout.


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We did a test run on our split original shroud, I had intended for the pattern to be inset when looking at the back.. Someone had the pattern clamped on the wrong side, and it was pressed outward instead.. Hindsight, when looking in the engine compartment from the side, the inset version would be more difficult to see the embossing, and this next "mistake" would be easier to see.


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Sometimes things happen for a reason. So guess what we're going with.... The pattern did not have enough real estate to make a wide sweeping turn in the corners, so when using the dies we'll stop short of the corners and will coin them afterward by hand. Time lapse:




We did have one slip-up, should be an easy fix...


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Looks a bit less blah now....


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