SPI black epoxy

Slofut

Promoted Users
Regular users of SPI will already know this but for those on the forum and on the fence
...I just bought a gallon kit of SPI black epoxy for $207 delivered! For the best quality epoxy primer there is. I use it for leveling like slick sand, for sealer before base, for the best possible foundation on bare metal or fiberglass before paint, also can be used for ground and finish coats on frame and unexposed bits. And IMHO it's the by far the best working, sanding and most durable epoxy I've ever used. And for $207/gal! If the salesman made a mistake and it's more money, please don't read this until after it's shipped out.
 
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jlcustomz

evil painter
I did a true torture test with it in a not recommended application a few years ago. Tried it on top of teo bumper plastic partially embedding the base of fiberglass mat into the wet epoxy as a possibility to firmly custom reshape a plastic bumper with fiberglass. I gave some samples only a couple of weeks of drying time & it fought hard pulling on the fiberglass strands, but did fail with enough pulling. Found some other samples over a year later & the dry fiberglass strands all snapped where it met the epoxy after enough pulling without affecting the epoxy bond to the plastic. So after being given true full cure time, that's truely bad ass tough.
 

Slofut

Promoted Users
Wow, that's impressive. After you use it a few times and get the learning curve down it's evident that other epoxy's just don't compare. I'm using up a quart of another brand black and the build is nowhere near the same, the texture when sanding isn't and I found myself after putting on many coats, unhappy with what was there and looking for a filler. I just nutted up and ordered a gallon of what I knew would make me happy. Hate to sound like a paid spokes person (Im certainly not!) But this coating is truly impressive.
 
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El Toro

Member
Wow, that's impressive. After you use it a few times and get the learning curve down it's evident that other epoxy's just don't compare. I'm using up a quart of another brand black and the build is nowhere near the same, the texture when sanding isn't and I found myself after putting on many coats, unhappy with what was there and looking for a filler. I just nutted up and ordered a gallon of what I knew would make me happy. Hate to sound like a paid spokes person (Im certainly not!) But this coating is truly impressive.
Slofut check your tech sheet on the " other brand of epoxy " to make sure body filler can be used over it. Just talked to a fellow who has a redo because of this .
 

Barry

Paint Fanatic
Staff member
Slofut check your tech sheet on the " other brand of epoxy " to make sure body filler can be used over it. Just talked to a fellow who has a redo because of this .
This is very important what said here.
This is exactly why one filler company, when asked about filler over epoxy, says, check with the epoxy company.

Of course, the problem is does the company rep even has a clue, and worse, if its private-label crap, they can't even get their clear solids right
let alone give you a straight answer on something like epoxy.
 

Slofut

Promoted Users
I'll be damn, I got a complimentary gal of waterborne w&g remover with my order! You guys are the best, thanks Barry and SPI! Love the new tech manual and price guide, nicely redone. That Isotta Fraschini is to die for and is a huge statement for SPI.
 

Slofut

Promoted Users
Now that's what black epoxy is supposed to look like!
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RustyJ

Promoted Users
I've used a few epoxies over the years but when I found out about SPI, I knew I found the best one. It goes on very smooth, it's durable, like you said you can sand it and paint over it. I think the part I like the best is you can mix some extra and seal it in an air tight jar for use a couple of days later. As opposed to others that I have to mix only enough for 1 application, cures too quickly. If it starts to get a little thicker I add a little urethane reducer. I used it in engine compartment, underbody, even the rear end and differential.

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Slofut

Promoted Users
Rln, the 700 waterborne is completely different naturally. I prefer the solvent based 90 percent of the time, it evaporates fast and is a really great w&g remover. I use it on 2ft/sq areas at the time to wipe on/wipe off. The waterborne to me is good for pre cleaning say a new panel that may have dirt and fingerprints, maybe wax markings etc... but if you have a grease area that doesn't come off with waterborne you can let dry and go back over it with 710. I suspect waterborne was made to play well with waterborne paint systems which I have not used. But they both certainly have their place. I will add though, that I have used a couple other water based w&g removers and neither was nearly as effective as this one. Others were more like detergents similar to windex, this one is much stronger and smells to have maybe ammonia and alcohol in it?
 

texasking

Promoted Users
Each w&g remover removes contaminants the other won't. 700 is a much better cleaner on bare metal, but it won't remove tar or glue. 710 removes those, but won't touch vegetable oil, (oily fingerprints, donuts, fried chicken :) ), no matter how much you scrub. The only way to be sure a surface is clean of everything is to use both, or wash the surface with dawn then 710, IMO.
 

crashtech

Combo Man
There is no substitute for SPI #700 for cleaning bare metal before epoxy primer. Whatever else you use, skip 700 at your own peril. In addition to having a clean air supply and keeping detail products miles away from paint processes, keep food off the dang shop floor and mandate thorough hand washing before returning to work. I like a midday snack just like the next guy, but I'll be damned if I go near bare metal with greasy fingers...
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
Rln, the 700 waterborne is completely different naturally. I prefer the solvent based 90 percent of the time, it evaporates fast and is a really great w&g remover. I use it on 2ft/sq areas at the time to wipe on/wipe off. The waterborne to me is good for pre cleaning say a new panel that may have dirt and fingerprints, maybe wax markings etc... but if you have a grease area that doesn't come off with waterborne you can let dry and go back over it with 710. I suspect waterborne was made to play well with waterborne paint systems which I have not used. But they both certainly have their place. I will add though, that I have used a couple other water based w&g removers and neither was nearly as effective as this one. Others were more like detergents similar to windex, this one is much stronger and smells to have maybe ammonia and alcohol in it?
SPI 700 will remove grease. ;) I suspect you are mistaking tar for grease. It's also far better at removing silicone contaminants than any solvent based W&G remover. It's excellent to use on it's own (as long as your panel is free of tar or adhesive) and in combination with a solvent based W&G remover like SPI 710. It has so many uses. Aftermarket bumper covers sometimes come with a primer that dissolves when you use a solvent based W&G. Waterbourne does not attack it. It'll clean your hands and tools too. I love the stuff.
 

Slofut

Promoted Users
Good info everybody. Chris, is it safe to use on month old fresh spi uv clear? I expected a detergent type water based cleaner and first thing i did was wipe a good coat across the freshly painted hood of my vette. When i smelled the ammonia i immediately started looking for my dry rag to get it off. Seemed pretty strong for fresh paint?
 
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