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Building to Sell?

#22
I know a guy who has owned an original 68 or 69 z28 302 motor since high school - decided to “pro-tour” it - LS motor , coil overs - 4 link rear suspension, mini tubs - been offered over 100 grand for it ! Doubt he would have got that in restored condition-maybe ? Anyways he drives it everywhere - even road course racing- he was afraid to in original shape
 
#24
Unless it for a car collection, people want an interior and options of a Mercedes, modern drivetrain (no carb), so they can get in it turn key and go anywhere but the outside looks like a classic except for the modern wheels and tires.
The old farts like me that drool over Model A's, 30's Packards, Cords, Alburns and all original 40's, 50's and 60' cars are dying off.
Thanks. I still love the 60s muscle cars so guess I am becoming a dinosaur!
 
#26
Shine you are right about that. Did a 72 Nova and had 17K in the car took forever to get 20 K I was VERY lucky for that. Don't like a true under water flood cars
 
#27
flood cars must be bought right . it is possible to bring them back. coastal cars have to be neutralized because of salt. 90% of it will be fine. upholstery and electronics must be replaced . a flood car is better buy than a beat up survivor .
 
#28
I've been attending the street rod scene for 20 + years now and what you see is every year the crowd (car owners) gets older and older. Not much fresh blood coming into the hobby and at some point there will be a glut of street rods on the market. Perhaps that's already being reflected in the auction results.
 

MikeS

The New Guy
#30
When I see what classic cars are being sold for these days it sure is an eye opener.
Back in 1979/1980 I bought two '67 Camaro SS/RS's with original 396's when they were considered gas pigs.
The convertible was $500 and had a seized motor. Nothing a new crank and dimple rods couldn't fix. I have $12,000 into that total frame off restoration (well....as frame off as a uni-body can be) and now sits with SPI clear as its top layer. The coupe I paid $4000 back then and still has original everything including paint so nothing more than the cost of tires was invested. I've had many offers to sell but turn them down because I willed the cars to my son and daughter.

Mike
 
#34
If the insurance co pays and car is a total or flood loss the a salvage title will with that car. Some flood cars are for parts only. After the storm Sandy I watched a lot of late model stuff sell at Manheim auto auction branded ''PARTS ONLY'' . Now with that said some owners did not have covage and these cars have clean titles . Buyer beware !
 
#36
i will be looking for drivetrains not cars. unless it is an older vette. this is not the business for the faint of heart or inexperienced . you can loose your ass quickly.it is real easy to spend a year of labor and ton of money only to make 20-25k or less .
 
#37
Intersting topic. Couldn't imagine trying to build one to sell on a gamble. I think muscle is dead unless upgraded. Currently doing all the paint work for a 68'442 like the one my dad bought new. I know with both of our free labor he still will have close to what a finished one would cost. Granted it won't be as nice as what we will do but it would be drivable now.

Trucks are in and have been but they have to be like the ones Barry was mentioning. Stockers bring money but not payback money. Patina whether original or fake is still in style on the trucks.

Traditional hot rods like rsss396 mentioned might work also. They seem to always have a following. A justified one also as some are pretty cool. I don't even look at street rods. Walk right by, not interesting to me. Those were cookie cutter years of picking a color, drivetrain, wheels, and they all look the same to me.

Most everything I work on is ancient. Most pre-war and currently a 1908 Packard so I'm out of touch on what is cool. The stuff I work wouldn't be profitable to try and sell because the initial cost can be so much. Huge investment on a gamble.

A few years ago I built a 59' GMC 250 with 2008 drivetrain but appears to be stock. I like it but I think I'd enjoy it more if it had original stuff. Seems like cheating to drive it. It's my shop truck and I use it but feel/sound of driving an old vehicle is diminished. Driven a 57' vette done up with LS stuff last summer and felt the same way. I'm just different I guess so that makes my tastes not very aplicable to building flippers.
 
#39
Intersting topic. Couldn't imagine trying to build one to sell on a gamble. I think muscle is dead unless upgraded. Currently doing all the paint work for a 68'442 like the one my dad bought new. I know with both of our free labor he still will have close to what a finished one would cost. Granted it won't be as nice as what we will do but it would be drivable now.

Trucks are in and have been but they have to be like the ones Barry was mentioning. Stockers bring money but not payback money. Patina whether original or fake is still in style on the trucks.

Traditional hot rods like rsss396 mentioned might work also. They seem to always have a following. A justified one also as some are pretty cool. I don't even look at street rods. Walk right by, not interesting to me. Those were cookie cutter years of picking a color, drivetrain, wheels, and they all look the same to me.

Most everything I work on is ancient. Most pre-war and currently a 1908 Packard so I'm out of touch on what is cool. The stuff I work wouldn't be profitable to try and sell because the initial cost can be so much. Huge investment on a gamble.

A few years ago I built a 59' GMC 250 with 2008 drivetrain but appears to be stock. I like it but I think I'd enjoy it more if it had original stuff. Seems like cheating to drive it. It's my shop truck and I use it but feel/sound of driving an old vehicle is diminished. Driven a 57' vette done up with LS stuff last summer and felt the same way. I'm just different I guess so that makes my tastes not very aplicable to building flippers.
I agree with the old car feel. I guess my first ride in a '68 Plymouth GTX stuck with me. My uncle had ordered it brand new from the dealer when he was coming home from Nam.
The rumble of the 440, the acceleration that threw you into the seat and wouldn't allow you to move forward until the next shift, the speedo climbing quickly upwards of 120 mph, all impacted me. Kind of like my first ride on a Harley. LOL
 
#40
I agree with the old car feel. I guess my first ride in a '68 Plymouth GTX stuck with me. My uncle had ordered it brand new from the dealer when he was coming home from Nam.
The rumble of the 440, the acceleration that threw you into the seat and wouldn't allow you to move forward until the next shift, the speedo climbing quickly upwards of 120 mph, all impacted me. Kind of like my first ride on a Harley. LOL
I did a frame off on a 440 68 Charger R/T for a friend. He loves it but one ride in my LS powered Camaro he was sold. Both rides have their place imho. I prefer the reliability and performance that comes with a modern modern fuel injected engine and overdrive transmission.

Don