1969 Chevy C10

Drilling spot welds is a pain.
Lot's of rusted through metal in this area. Driver's side is not near as bad.
Kick Panel Right.JPG

Kick Panel Right Front Spot Welds.JPG
 

EddieF

Top Banana
Thought of this thread last night when a CMA song went something like "i got a 8' bed that i don't have to make".
Washed my sheets 2 days ago lol.
 
The bottom of the cowl vent surround was toast so I cut it out and fabricated a new one. Warning - my fabrication and welding skills are nowhere near the pros on this site.
Cowl Vent Surround bottom rusted.JPG


Cowl Vent Surround bottom fabricated.JPG


The kick panel will be replaced later on so I didn't spot weld it to the back panel.
Some epoxy primer to keep the rust from coming back.
Cowl Vent Surround in Epoxy.JPG


Order new bottom patches for the A-pillars as these are all be rusted away.
A-pillar Right rusted through.JPG

A-pillar Right rusted.JPG


Floor supports are already on there way.
 
Sealed up the cowl vent surround and got the bare metal in epoxy.
Cowl Right Side Epoxy.JPG


Next I cut the lower A-pillar rust out.
A-pillar lower right removed.JPG

A-pillar lower right bottom backside.JPG


Cut the patch for the A-pillar but won't install it until later.
A-pillar lower right patch test fit.JPG


Removed the rusted kick panel metal and this revealed the rust on the back of the A-pillar that will need to be media blasted.
Kick panel right side area.JPG


Kick panel right side removed.JPG


Of course I wasn't happy to find out how small the kick panel patch is. I'll have to add some height to it before installing.
Kick panel right side patch too short.JPG


Ordered a floor pan patch for this side as well. So next order of business is to remove more spot welds.
 

John Long

Member
To successfully finish a major build of a rusty vehicle you have look at it like riding a motorcycle. "The journey is the destination."

If you don't enjoy the shop time and the feeling of accomplishment that goes along with it, you probably will never finish it. I can only imagine what you have told your friend he is getting into if he is paying you a fair wage to do this for him.

John
 
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To successfully finish a major build of a rusty vehicle you have look at it like riding a motorcycle. "The journey is the destination."

If you don't enjoy the shop time and the feeling of accomplishment that goes along with it, you probably will never finish it. I can only imagine what you have told your friend he is getting into if he is paying you a fair wage to do this for him.

John

You must have been reading my mind. I was just planning a 5 hour motorcycle ride down old Route 66 for some enjoyment.
Temps are in the 70s this week but dropping into the low 60 in the next few days.
 
Just got back. I generally ride alone but occaissionaly my wife will come along. I think that's once every 3 or 4 Blue Moons.
Here's a couple of pictures for you:
Middle of Nowhere Route 66.JPG


I have learned that taking pictures of unique stores and gift shops entices my wife to ride along next time. When I showed her this picture she said, "what's it like inside" to which I replied, "I didn't go in."
Hackberry General Store.JPG


Now I need to get back to work. :(
 
Ordered a floor pan patch for the right side as the rust was quite extensive.
Removed the rusted portion of floor support and fitted the patch panel for installation later.
Floor Support Right Rust removed.JPG


Floor Support Right Patch fitted.JPG


Pulled the tranny cover and found a mess:
Transmission Before.JPG


Couldn't stand looking at it so spent an hour scraping and cleaning the top side enough to make it recognizable.
Transmission After.JPG


Trying to tackle one side of the truck at a time when removing rust and welding in panels.
 
Decided to work on the right front fender while waiting for the floor pan to arrive.
This fender is by far in the worst shape as it obviously took a hit at some time in its life.
The worst of it was this puncture and it had limited access from the back side.
Fender Front Right rip.JPG

Fender Right puncture front.JPG


After working it with a metal punch and modified screw driver, I got it close enough to weld but certainly not perfect. Once it is blasted and covered with epoxy I am hoping a skim coat with filler will suffice. If not I'll work it some more then.
Fender Right Puncture welded.JPG


There was rip in the metal near the rear of the wheel well.
Fender Right rip in metal front.JPG

Fender Right rip in metal back.JPG


Got that welded shut and pounded out a few more dents.
Fender Right rip welded.JPG


I will need to reinstall the inner fender to get it into proper shape before doing much more. However that limits access to the back side so . . .
 
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