Silver metallic

jcclark

Oldtimer
JC Clark said that Bulldog adhesion promoter will work for blender.
Back in the day, before I started using basecoat blender, I would apply a coat of Bulldog on the entire panel
before putting basecoat on, mainly when spraying silvers, it fills the scratches and gives a good even surface
on the entire panel so the base lays the same all over. Even sanding the panel first with 600 will sometimes
show scratches with silvers, especially out in the blend area where the new paint is transparent.
The Bulldog eliminated that, it says it will fill 320 grit scratches.
It always worked really well for me.
 

Slofut

Promoted Users
School me guys, but I have a hard time wanting to spray anything out of a spray can onto a nice paint job. But again I haven't had to blend a panel since the early 80's. Would this compromise the long term quality of the finish paint? Would SPI ad pro not do the same? Not criticizing at all, just wondering especially since it looks to be common practice.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
School me guys, but I have a hard time wanting to spray anything out of a spray can onto a nice paint job. But again I haven't had to blend a panel since the early 80's. Would this compromise the long term quality of the finish paint? Would SPI ad pro not do the same? Not criticizing at all, just wondering especially since it looks to be common practice.
I would use SPI Intercoat before Bulldog or SPI's Ad-Pro. And I would only use it as a means to reduce my RTS base when blending. If you carry your scratches out to 800 wet you pretty much eliminate the need for a wet bed. A wet bed is mainly used so that when you are doing collision repair work you don't have to worry about taking your scratches to 800 wet. Like JC said above it fills the 400-600 grit scratches and lets the base lay down correctly.
 

JC Daniel

Promoted Users
I painted the hood and tailgate Saturday and everything looked really good except some mottling around the edges of one repair, I buffed the truck today and put the hood on and lo and behold the color does not match. The Shop said they will replace the paint at no cost but I now don't know what to do. Should I wax and grease over both parts before starting? I did buff and wax both parts and am up in the air now, Can I sand the mottled parts heavier than the rest?
 

texasking

Promoted Users
@JC Daniel, it is hard to diagnose what happened over the forum. When you say it doesn't match, did you have to buy a different batch of paint? Did you carry your blend to the edge and is that where it doesn't match? When you say mottling around the edge of the repair, did it lift the edge of the primer? Just trying to get a better picture of what happened. Silver can be tricky because of the color variance you can get just just by the way it is sprayed. A wet area will be a totally different shade than a dry area. Even using the same paint, chances of butt painting silver and having it match is not good. I won't even attempt it, I just blend to save myself from having a probable redo.
 

Slofut

Promoted Users
JC, is the mottling you're referring to in the color or? It sounds like you may be talking about a rough texture to the paint finish, is that why you want to sand the mottling more?
 

JC Daniel

Promoted Users
The mottling was in the basecoat paint, I am pretty sure that since it has been cleared, denibbed and buffed that the mottling will not show through the new paint.
 

JC Daniel

Promoted Users
Sorry to leave out so fast a while ago Crash, The Metallics were mottled together and looked darker around the one repair.
 

crashtech

Combo Man
It looked like you were saying that the appearance of mottling was improved by sanding and polishing, that's why I wanted some clarification.
 

AAE

Learner
JC, there is another way to paint metallics. I don't think there's a name for it but you paint from the outside in. So, your first coat would be way out where the blend would be. The next coat is sprayed within that area, not getting close to it's edges. Continue doing that with the subsequent coats until you have coverage. That way the paint is falling on a "wet" surface and reduces the mottling effect.
 
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