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Interface pad on da 400 grit wetsand.

#1
Anyone have any luck using an interface pad 400 grit and da to wetsand. I feel like it wouldn’t make the panels wavy if you keep it flat since all your straightening is done with coarse grits your just using it to prep for paint adhesion. Will be sanding epoxy and sealing with epoxy I’ve never tried this I’ve wlways hand sanded but this sure speeds up the process.
 
#2
That is a hard question to answer. I've seen people screw up a panel with a DA, but I had a really good bodyman that finished his bodywork with a DA and never had a problem with any of his work. I think it all depends on the operator and the shape of the panel. Even with an interface pad some concave panels are hard to sand evenly with a DA. Maybe go over it with a DA first then finish the tighter areas by hand. I do it all the time on collision work, but do restoration work by hand.
 

orangejuiced86

Garage hack at night.....
#3
My final sand is usually 400-600 grit on a DA with an interface pad on my final primed surface. You'd really have to work at it IMO to distort the surface at that grit plus with the pad. Everything up to that (320) is by hand with a block. It's always been the best way, for me at-least, to avoid any sanding lines.

And just to note: I do avoid body lines when I'm sanding with it.
 
#4
I think the interface pad actually forces you to use less hand pressure. Just using a disc on a hard rubber pad on your DA immediately puts pressure on high spots. I think it works best on a sanders that have the air adjustment to control the spin speed. If you plan to switch to the DA, I think its a necessity. If you are worried about lines, stack a couple together.
 
#5
I use an electric random orbital w/ interface pad for all my clear sanding, but of course it's dry sanding.
Starting with 1500 then 2000.
I like dry better because you can see what you're sanding and how much as you're going.
I also use 600 dry for sanding existing paint before painting.
The 6" random orbit leaves a much straighter panel compared to when I do it by hand.
I run the sander at a little less than half speed. Works great.
 
#6
I use an electric random orbital w/ interface pad for all my clear sanding, but of course it's dry sanding.
Starting with 1500 then 2000.
I like dry better because you can see what you're sanding and how much as you're going.
I also use 600 dry for sanding existing paint before painting.
The 6" random orbit leaves a much straighter panel compared to when I do it by hand.
I run the sander at a little less than half speed. Works great.
What brand do you use?
 
#7
I use a Porter Cable random orbital, a right angle one.
They sell this tool as a sander and also a polisher, with different ID numbers but they're identical.
https://www.portercable.com/product...s/6-in-variablespeed-random-orbit-sander/7346

The right angle RO sanders rotate faster and orbit less, where as the "palm" type RO
sanders like most woodworkers use, they spin slower and orbit more, which gives
a finer finish. I think the right angle ones are just right, in the middle of a palm sander and a DA (air sander)
which is a little to aggressive for me on clear coats.
This Porter Cable one has served me well for over 20 years now.
 
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