1941 chrysler coupe build

Bob Heine

Oldtimer
I like the tailpipe mount at the center of the rear crossmember -- as I recall, that's leftover pieces from the engine mount process. Just beautiful. I'd have mirrors on the floor with that chassis!!

Your car should please everyone, with a Chrysler body, Ford suspension and GM engine and transmission.

You might want to put a few more bolts in that driver side aluminum cylinder head.:)
 

123pugsy

Member
Bob Hollinshead;11582 said:
LOL!, You've got a few hours invested! That's some amazing metal work and thought put into this. Can't wait to see the finished product.

Thanks Bob.

Your wait should only be about 5 to 7 years....


Bob Heine;11583 said:
I like the tailpipe mount at the center of the rear crossmember -- as I recall, that's leftover pieces from the engine mount process. Just beautiful. I'd have mirrors on the floor with that chassis!!

Your car should please everyone, with a Chrysler body, Ford suspension and GM engine and transmission.

You might want to put a few more bolts in that driver side aluminum cylinder head.:)

Thanks Bob.

Having the Big Three in the build should be OK. Of coarse real Mopar guys hate to see a BBC engine in a Chrysler. :p


ADTKART;11584 said:
Sure looks like a lot of stainless in that one.

Beautiful!

Aaron


Thanks for the kind words Aaron.


crashtech;11588 said:
I'm speechless. It's beyond cool!

Thanks crashtech.



Jim C;11590 said:
nice work for sure. its nice and very rare to see some quality metalwork.

Thanks Jim.
 

123pugsy

Member
I painted a mock grill on the front of the car.
Similar to a 40 Willys....






I discovered a mess with the shape of the front panel on the driver's side, ouch......







Had to beat the snot out it ....






Made up a trim for the grill opening....










 

123pugsy

Member
I went down to Dutch Comstock's meet and brought my deck lid for a project while I was there.
The plan was to simply take it apart to knock out some dents from a falling exhaust manifold (don't ask) and then reassemble.
As you guys know, there's always something hiding under someone else's primer....





I made up a patch across the bottom...











And another piece to fill in some more rust thru and hardware openings in one shot...







Some welding and hours of slapper and dolly work....






Thanks for looking,
Pugsy
 

123pugsy

Member
[QUOTE='68 Coronet R/T;11646]Hey, where did all the pictures go? I am not seeing anything.[/QUOTE]

Sorry about that.

I have the pics hosted on another site.

I can't seem to upload them here.
It keeps saying the pic is too large. If its a 55KB pic it tells me its 54 KB over quota. Any tips?
 

Bob Heine

Oldtimer
123pugsy;11637 said:
And another piece to fill in some more rust thru and hardware openings in one shot...



Thanks for looking,
Pugsy
Pugsy, your artistry with metal is amazing. I hope you have a book deal to document this project. Quick question -- are those high/low marks on the metal or were you guys at the Metalmeet just bored and playing tic-tac-toe?
 

123pugsy

Member
Bob Heine;11651 said:
Pugsy, your artistry with metal is amazing. I hope you have a book deal to document this project. Quick question -- are those high/low marks on the metal or were you guys at the Metalmeet just bored and playing tic-tac-toe?
Not bored, highs and lows for more wheeling.
Didn't help as I ended up doing alot of hand planishing to give it more curve.
Next time I'll spend more time on my panels. I've only said this about 5 times so far and it still hasn't sunk in. :eek:
 

123pugsy

Member
The inner decklid had a few surpises as well....


















I got it back together and hit it with SPI epoxy. Of coarse the inner sides of each panel were hit prior to reassembly....
















That's where I am today.
I still have to flip it and hit the inside.

Alot of the specs you see are dust but most are pits from rust in the past.

I know you guys hate rust removers but I had to use some over the pitted areas. I applied it, allowed it to set for about ten minutes, scrubbed with a hand wire brush and then rinsed with water several times.
I then used a wire brush in a drill over the whole decklid followed by a scuffing with 80 grit prior the shooting the epoxy. Using the wire brush brought up alot of dust that was left behind from the rust remover even after a good rinse/wipe/rinse again deal. All the pits and surface area came to a nice shiny finish with no residue or rust left behind.
 

shine

Member
looking good . nothing wrong with phosphoric acid as long as it is used right. i've used a 55 gal drum of navel jelly since the 60's. :)
 

123pugsy

Member
Thanks shine.

After reading about it I made sure to get every spec of the stuff off.

50 year old naval jelly?

Mine is only about a week old now.
I'll take a shower one day though.
 

shine

Member
int the 70's we had no blasters that used anything but sand. wrong ! then we had the companies that dipped them. just about put us all out of business with failures. so we just stuck to sanding or navel jelly. now for some reason lacquer did not blow up if some was left. lead i guess. but all the sheet metal guys i knew used it all the time when delivering stuff. to my knowledge there is no magic chemical that will self neutralize phosphoric acid. if left long enough i guess the humidity would eventually do it but i aint playing that game.
 
To neutralize an acid you need to use a base.
Washing with lots of water is not neutralization, it is dilution.
If you neutralize with a base you will end up with a sludge.
The neutralized sludge can then be washed away.
I operated a large industrial acid break system for a number of years,(I used to be licensed as a class 2 water treatment operator)
we took a water and oil based rolling coolant and added up to 8000 ppm of 94% H2SO4, or 75% H3PO4, heated it to 230f , the water that came out of it after treatment had a pH of .5-1.5
we hit that with 12.0pH lime slurry to neutralize it to a 7.0-7.5 pH.
The resulting sludge settled out in a clarifier, then was pumped to a drum filter and the sludge was vacuum dried , shaved off the drum and put into large containers and buried as hazardous waste.

In the process of using H3PO4 (phosphoric acid) in the ospho or naval jelly type product the quantity of acid is not very large and the amount of water to dilute it is not to large, but I bet the local EPA would still not like those phosphates going into the water shed. Hell in this part of the woods they wont even let us purchase laundry soap that has phosphate in it.

If you really want to nuet it, then use a base, then wash the sludge off.

As we said in the business, dilution is not the solution to pollution.

Now back to the regularly schdeuled program. . .
 

123pugsy

Member
I ran into a nice problem with the front end metal.
The bottom of the hood would arc from the back to front, then it would go up and then down again.
This is the red line in the pic.
The head light plates are also going on an angle inwards as shown by the green line.

I had to do some mods. I will try to upload some more pics.

 

123pugsy

Member
Bob Hollinshead;16024 said:
So it's a little cross-eyed? sure can't tell in the pics, looks good.
That's just the tip of the iceberg.

Here's a better shot of the mess after trying to stretch it with a planishing hammer.





That didn't work so I started with a buck on top of the existing metal.........






Then cut out the lousy stuff..........







And made up a new piece..........



 
A

ADTKART

Why didn't you just use a shrinking disc on it? A few minutes with the magic tool and it would have fit like a glove. Then again, the way you love to beat on that stuff , it probably only took you an hour to make that new piece. You're like the energizer bunny when it comes to beating on that stuff. LOL

Aaron
 
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