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USING SPI EURO 2020 5000 FOR COLLISION REPAIR

#43
Back in my day, we'd get packing peanut encrusted cans and be happy with it!
That is true but I got an order today that took two boxes to ship and these new peanuts are great! They don't stick to everything like the old ones did. Take paint out of box, poor peanuts in trash, brake down box...., ...done. :)))

The old ones did stick to EVERYTHING!

Thanks Barry, (:))
John
 

jbc

New Member
#44
so ... why turn the fan off after clear coat? reason i ask is i have just a small shop with a large ac unit basically blowing up and use a fan on other side of shop to keep air in a circle pattern as this keeps it cool the best on a 95 degree day im still running 81 inside with a little less humid. bearable. if i clear coat and turn off the ac fan... i wont ever get the shop temp back down for the day... deli ma.. I basically shoot.. then go outside for a few minutes and return and hit second coat when time. In Alabama.. so humid and hot is the norm
 
#45
so ... why turn the fan off after clear coat? reason i ask is i have just a small shop with a large ac unit basically blowing up and use a fan on other side of shop to keep air in a circle pattern as this keeps it cool the best on a 95 degree day im still running 81 inside with a little less humid. bearable. if i clear coat and turn off the ac fan... i wont ever get the shop temp back down for the day... deli ma.. I basically shoot.. then go outside for a few minutes and return and hit second coat when time. In Alabama.. so humid and hot is the norm
I'm sure the reasoning behind turning the fan off is to limit how fast the surface dries. If it dries too quickly, The solvents underneath can get trapped causing die back or worse solvent pop. Turning the fan off after the mist has cleared is a little like adding a splash of retarder allowing it to stay wet a little longer, flow in and let the solvents come out.

John
 
#48
After you've done a few hundred, you figure out stripping to metal is quicker and better than trying to feather out the peeling paint or e coat and priming. What works best for me on a driver (especially white) is stripping to metal with 8" 80# on a rotary, then 80# da. Tape it up, spray 2-3 coats epoxy, wait 24hrs., sand with 320 dry-600 wet, and shoot it. Never have to worry about it peeling again, and you don't have any of the feathered out spots showing back up.
 
#50
the top coat seemed most affected anywhere it was on a "up" area the rest of the truck was good. I have to think it was a uv issue maybe? but the bottom primer is tuff as nails. looking at the picture would u keep going or cover it. Plan is to epoxy just like said above
then move on w primer and 2k. Thank you for the info, its great help.
 

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#52
Are you doing lots of bodywork? If not, there is no reason for 2K if the panels are stripped. Run your hand over the pictured panel and you will feel the uneven surface. This can be fixed with epoxy then 2K and LOTS more sanding, or finish stripping to metal and epoxy, then a light sanding just to remove texture. Faster, better, and cheaper.
 
#53
yep i locked the da in and started stripping as you said after the post, ordered some paper for my large sander and some more 80 for the da
follow up.. lot easier ty
 
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