• Having site issues? Contact Dub@southernPolyurethanes.com

Looking for Better Gun for an Overall

#1
Hi, guys. I own a Devilbiss Finishline that I'm using for primer right now, though I had intended to use it for all of my painting. But, the more that I read and research, the more I think I should get a better quality gun for bc/cc. I'd rather not spend $400+ on a new gun and have never trusted EBay. Does anyone have one of the usual suspects for sale? From my reading here I'm thinking a IWata LPH400, Tekna Copper or ProLite. Just fishing. Thanks!
 
#2
I bought my LPH400 on ebay a long, long time ago for $200. All I did was clean it thoroughly and it has been spraying fine ever since. Make sure whoever you buy from has excellent feedback rating and be sure to ask any questions about the product before you bid.
I also have the Tekna Copper 7E7 and it is a very good gun, easy to clean and operate.
The Iwata is "slower" than the Tekna or a SATA. The transfer rate is great but you have to spray at a slower pace than you do with the other two.
This is my opinion based on using the guns but I don't spray every day. Be interested to see what others have to say.
 
#3
I think maybe a slower gun would be better for me? Not only do I not spray every day, I don't spray every month. Well, maybe since the two months since I picked up my first spray gun!:p
 
#4
The Iwata LPH400 silver cap (1.4) is a great gun. I have sprayed a few projects with it, in fact if I am having trouble with clear, this is my go to gun.
It is meant to shoot at lower volume and pressure (LVLP) than most of the high end guns. You do need to stay about 4" from the surface while spraying though to keep things flowing.
 
#7
I agree, the Iwata is slower. It's perfect for me since I don't do overalls.
Most my work is bumpers or just a panel or two from bodywork.
If I was going to do overalls I'd buy a faster bigger gun, when I do have
to do an entire side of a car, which isn't often, the Iwata can be a bit slow,
I would like a bigger fan pattern.
 
#9
I agree, the Iwata is slower. It's perfect for me since I don't do overalls.
Most my work is bumpers or just a panel or two from bodywork.
If I was going to do overalls I'd buy a faster bigger gun, when I do have
to do an entire side of a car, which isn't often, the Iwata can be a bit slow,
I would like a bigger fan pattern.
Exactly!
I use the Tekna Copper for the larger projects be cause it has a large fan and allows you to move a bit faster.
 
#10
So my thought is that a slower gun would be more forgiving for a new painter because it will give you more time. I'm not considering that maybe a longer time could be detrimental to the job due to something flashing off before you get done or something like that. In other words, since I think I'll be doing the entire car when I get ready to finally paint it, is the choice of a fast or slow gun based on something more than just how long it takes you to get the paint on from a time-saving aspect?
 
#11
is the choice of a fast or slow gun based on something more than just how long it takes you to get the paint on from a time-saving aspect?

i think one thing between fast and slow guns is:
are ya doing work where ya gotta get the work out fast(collision work) to make $$$?
or a home hobbiest or doing restorations where ya have time?

i'll vote for the tekna,too. not only bc/cc lays great with it, but also polyurethane,lacquer, and shellac on furniture comes out great.
 
#12
So my thought is that a slower gun would be more forgiving for a new painter because it will give you more time. I'm not considering that maybe a longer time could be detrimental to the job due to something flashing off before you get done or something like that. In other words, since I think I'll be doing the entire car when I get ready to finally paint it, is the choice of a fast or slow gun based on something more than just how long it takes you to get the paint on from a time-saving aspect?
You want to be able to keep your "wet edge" all over, so that everything melts in,
so faster allows that.
An extreme comparison would be to paint a hood with a touch up gun, one
that gives a 2" spray pattern verses a gun giving 12" pattern.
The little one will wear you out, and be harder to keep even, it's just easier
with a larger pattern.
And when you're old like me, it gets tiring with a slow gun.
 
#13
You might want to consider your compressor output when choosing a gun. I love my w400 bellaria and it uses very little air... Only complaint may be transfer efficiency. Just got a great deal on a second hand Copper. The 7e7 Requires more cfms but seems to use less material. Been using it with 1.3 for base and like it a lot. I'm not a pro and have no bottom line profit concerns so I don't mind a little less efficiency and speed so the iwata is my fav... If I had to choose.
 
#14
Hi, all. Just found a Tekna Copper on Amazon Warehouse for just under $300. It's used in "Good" condition. Says it comes in original packaging, so I assume it was a one-use return or similar. It's the 1.3mm / 1.4mm with the 7E7 air cap. What do you think for my bc/cc? I'm using a Devilbiss FinishLine right now, but have only used it for primer so far. Thanks!
 
#15
Hi, all. Just found a Tekna Copper on Amazon Warehouse for just under $300. It's used in "Good" condition. Says it comes in original packaging, so I assume it was a one-use return or similar. It's the 1.3mm / 1.4mm with the 7E7 air cap. What do you think for my bc/cc? I'm using a Devilbiss FinishLine right now, but have only used it for primer so far. Thanks!
Seems like a decent price for a Copper with 2 tips... I've only used mine a couple times for basecoat, but so far its been really good. I do have an FLG3 and its fan is very small compared to the Copper. Otherwise its not a bad gun and I'm sure you can get good results with your FinishLine. That said, its nice to have a dedicated primer/ sealer gun which gets a lot of use anyway. Good luck!
 
#16
I don't have much experience, but I'll comment on the Copper gun. I have one with the 1.4 tip and 7E7 cap. I use it for base and clear and love it. I haven't mastered it by any means, but I've been pretty pleased with the results. I'm finding that as my painting conditions change, (temperature) I have to make adjustments as well.
 
Top