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How much High Build Do you use?

#1
When I did my Coronet I bought a gallon of High Build but quickly ran out and ended up using more epoxy/glazing compound layers. With a large 60's car how much high build would you typically use to get it straight? I am embarking on a Duster for my daughter and need to make my SPI order to start the body work. I am sure I will be much better on my second attempt so I am guessing 2 gallons should do me.

Thanks
Jim
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#2
Jim it's all gonna depend on the condition of the body. No two are ever alike. Millage wise I would try to minimize how much of any urethane you have on a panel. Lots of urethane is no better than glaze and probably worse. Cars that have a lot of either are much more prone to chipping as well. Depending on your skillset that means getting the body very close in metal (ideal) or using filler/glaze. Ideally you never want more than a 1/16 of filler or glaze to ensure longevity and decent chip resistance. 1/8 is acceptable but not ideal. For the highest quality job get your body as close as you can in metal.

Check out Kent White's site (https://www.tinmantech.com/) for some very good videos on the subject. (metalfinishing) Also Jeff Lilly has a bunch of free tech tips on his site. http://www.jefflilly.com/build-tips/ Lot of excellent info. Check this one out in particular: http://www.jefflilly.com/build-tips/36-dent-removal/
 
#3
I can't add much to Chris' excellent advice. Usually when we are done the epoxy/block/putty/block/repeat routine, the body needs very little urethane primer. I put two full coats of epoxy followed by two coats of urethane primer once we're sure that the poly putty stage is over, mostly out of habit than anything, since it would be entirely possible to finish with just epoxy instead. Urethane blocks a little nicer, maybe.

Problem panels might get a few coats of poly primer, but that really builds up on edges and holes, and must be carefully sanded out of those areas before continuing, or there will be problems later.
 
#4
Thanks guys. I have learned about the chipping on the Coronet. I think it was Shine that said before the last sealer coat he sands the panel edges all the way down to metal which is what I should have done.
 
#5
Check out Kent White's site (https://www.tinmantech.com/) for some very good videos on the subject. (metalfinishing) Also Jeff Lilly has a bunch of free tech tips on his site. http://www.jefflilly.com/build-tips/ Lot of excellent info. Check this one out in particular: http://www.jefflilly.com/build-tips/36-dent-removal/
So this is really a lot like getting dings and dents out of the stainless trim then.... Never thought about going that far on the body....
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#6
So this is really a lot like getting dings and dents out of the stainless trim then.... Never thought about going that far on the body....
It's what used to be known as bodywork before plastic filler became available and popular. The Old Guys are all gone now but bodywork used to mean bumping out a dent and metal finishing it. To me it's about craftsmanship and doing the highest quality possible.

I will also add that if you go to a car show you can tell the cars that have a LOT of urethane or poly primer on them. At least I can. A car with minimal primer on it has a different look to it than something that has a lot of millage on it.
 
#7
I agree with Chris. Working on a '62 Chevy Pickup that was painted about 6 years ago at a shop somewhere in California. They basically treated the rust and then covered the truck in 1/4" (more in some places) of poly primer/filler and sculpted the truck lines with a sanding block. The truck had an ultra smooth look to it but the paint was cracking everywhere. The owner wanted me to fix the cracks but I refused and advised him to strip the truck so we could see what was under the paint.
Here's a chip:
Paint Chip Layers.JPG
 
#8
I will also add that if you go to a car show you can tell the cars that have a LOT of urethane or poly primer on them. At least I can. A car with minimal primer on it has a different look to it than something that has a lot of millage on it.
If you sand the edges down to metal before paint it will odd if there is a lot of filler in the panel. If you have a lot of filler on the panel and don't sand the edges down, then it will look very odd and chip easier.



It's what used to be known as bodywork before plastic filler became available and popular. The Old Guys are all gone now but bodywork used to mean bumping out a dent and metal finishing it. To me it's about craftsmanship and doing the highest quality possible.
The owner of the car in this next picture brought his friend over to see the car, and his friend took his time checking the car out while it was in bare metal, then looked at me and said "Didn't you have to do any body work on this car?"
I said Yes, I body worked every square inch of it.

 
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Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#12
Chevman is probably too modest to say this but to get that kind of straightness and panel fit on a Tri Five takes some real skill. That's not how it looked like when it left the Factory. That is a ton of work there. Awesome stuff Chevman!
 
#13
Thanks guys, and Jim I'm not suggesting you try this, its just what can be done. Everyone can probably do better metal work than they do, and we all have to find a happy medium that will live long enough for its owner to enjoy and get his moneys worth.

Yes, it was a lot of work!
 
#14
Thanks guys, and Jim I'm not suggesting you try this, its just what can be done. Everyone can probably do better metal work than they do, and we all have to find a happy medium that will live long enough for its owner to enjoy and get his moneys worth.

Yes, it was a lot of work!
Now I feel guilty about using the little bit of filler that I have used on my car. I guess I'll worry about that 20 or 30 years from now. I really didn't use much, but I could have done more metal work. Speaking of which, I need to head out to the garage and put some filler on right now. :rolleyes:
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#16
Now I feel guilty about using the little bit of filler that I have used on my car. I guess I'll worry about that 20 or 30 years from now. I really didn't use much, but I could have done more metal work. Speaking of which, I need to head out to the garage and put some filler on right now. :rolleyes:
'
Do the best you can with the skills you have now. :) Never be satisfied with what you know, keep trying to grow and do better. For me it started when I spent a couple of days at Herschel "Junior" Conways Shop (google Junior Conway) in L.A. back in 1990. I was blown away by what I saw, and the techniques he talked about. Example while I was there a Brand New 1990 Ferrari Testarossa was in the shop, stripped to bare metal and being repainted. I asked him what happened to it, he said the Owner didn't like the paint and wanted him to redo it. :eek: Multiple Classic Ferraris in his Shop. That visit to his Shop is what started my passion for this although I got sidetracked for many years in Collision Repair.:)
 
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