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Epoxy Re-Coat Question

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#1
Just a quick question for Barry and everyone. Doing this Chevy P/U. The inside of the bed was typical of most trucks of that era. Lot of surface rust. Removed all surface rust and ended up using some Ospho. Neutralized it properly, then DA'ed it with 80 grit, then shot 3 coats of black epoxy. I am way past the 7 day re-coat window so I have been sanding the entire bed with 180 by hand. Had some deep pitting pretty much all over the bed floor. After sanding many of the pits are still shiny and I don't see any easy way to get to them. Only way would be to remove the epoxy in the pits with a wire brush which would be stupid I think. Will I have any issues if I re-epoxy over those pits? Keep in mind these are very small pits left by surface rust. Lots of sanded surface area around them.
Personally I don't think it will be an issue but since I'm sure some of you have run into the same issue I'd like to hear your thoughts. Thanks.
 
#3
I always thought of a similar situation on panels that have a lap flange, like the inside of a door where the skin wraps around. You can hit that seam with a scuff pad but it never seems to get all of it as good as you would like. I always told myself that such a small deal like that would be held down by the surrounding well scuffed area.

Now if that's the right mindset I don't know, not sure how else to do it.

Also, your killing me on this truck, I am really looking forward to some pictures.
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#4
Thanks Jim. Just needed to hear it from someone else. :)
Sprint I'll take some pics when finished. Would have shared pics of the whole process but my cell phone bit the dust with a bunch of pics on it and I said heck with it. I need to start taking more but honestly I don't like worrying about pics on top of everything else. I'm too old.:) So I'll take pics when finished. It's really not going to be anything special though.
Pics of your bed though gave me motivation to do this one nicely. Your doing nice work on yours. :)
 
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#5
Chris, I have epoxied over areas like you described without any sign of adhesion problems. I believe the epoxy bites into itself even after the 7 day window, at least better than anything else. I have used one of those nylon cup brushes inside a blasted, epoxied bed that had bad surface rust, and it scuffed it really well and quick without taking the epoxy off. In this particular instance I reapplied epoxy over epoxy that was over 2 weeks old, then sprayed bedliner, but I believe they make a brush that is the equivalent to a 180 scratch that would work when repainting.
 
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Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#7
what effeect does a quick solvent wipedown have? better/worse?
Probably close to zero due to the fact epoxy is very solvent resistant when cured. What I'm sanding has been on there a month or so.

Texas thanks for the nylon brush idea. I've got one (never found a use for it until this :)) so I'll give it a try.
 
#9
Chris, I'm working on my first restoration and have not got past the epoxy / filler stage yet. This is a question that I have been wondering as well because the 7 day window closes faster than I can work. For those pitted areas you describe, I worked them over really good with maroon scotch brite, then blocked with 180 before respraying with another coat of epoxy. I plan to keep filling those pits with more layers of epoxy and blocking, instead of using glaze / filler.
 
#10
Chris, I'm working on my first restoration and have not got past the epoxy / filler stage yet. This is a question that I have been wondering as well because the 7 day window closes faster than I can work. For those pitted areas you describe, I worked them over really good with maroon scotch brite, then blocked with 180 before respraying with another coat of epoxy. I plan to keep filling those pits with more layers of epoxy and blocking, instead of using glaze / filler.
This brings up a question I have wondered about. I plan to use only epoxy primer on my '68 GTX project. Is it best to build the epoxy layer over a few days and then start block sanding or should I just shoot the usual two coats, sand, two more coats, etc.?
 

Chris_Hamilton

Trying to be the best me, I can be
#12
Three coats, allowing minimum of 1 hour between coats. You could probably do four coats that way. Just give plenty of time between One to two hours between coats. Block that then repeat the 3-4 coats. That should get you close. Two coats with the film build of epoxy you are going to have to do 2x as many sessions. Nothing wrong with that but it will be more work and time.
 
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